7.6.14

FIT XXth World Congress, Berlin, August 4 – 6, 2014

FIT XXth World Congress

Berlin, August 4 – 6, 2014

Meeting translators, interpreters and terminologists from around the world
 WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM FIT WORLD CONGRESS?
The FIT World Congress is an international conference which brings together all those involved in the language sector: translators, interpreters and terminologists, students and teachers, newcomers and experienced professionals, product and service providers – all those for whom professional language services are a must.

Presentations, panel discussions and workshops

The presentations have a maximum duration of 30 minutes. In most cases, an opportunity for brief discussion is provided at the end of blocks comprising three or four presentations.
The panel discussions are timed for 90 minutes. Panel members and members of the audience exchange their ideas on current topics from professional practice.
The workshops last 90 or 180 minutes, depending on the subject, and provide a more intensive examination of individual issues.
Would you like to submit an abstract? We look forward to receiving your suggestion.

To find out more click here


 

6.1.14

Summer Course in Audiovisual Translation

English into French, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Polish

Spanish into English

30th June - 25th July 2014

Course structure

This intensive four-week course provides a theoretical framework for translators and researchers in the area of AVT as well as hands-on training with audiovisual material taken from different authentic contexts.
The course is divided in three modules:

Module A: Subtitling (30 June - 8 July)

12 hours of language specific teaching 

Module B: Dubbing and Voice-over (9 - 17 July)

12 hours of language specific teaching

Module C: Accessibility to the Media (18 - 25 July)

12 hours of teaching in English (no language specific sessions)

Resources

UCL has a very well equipped multimedia Translation Lab with state-of-the-art facilities. You will work with audiovisual digital material and will have unlimited access to computers, video and DVD viewing facilities, translation software, and professional subtitling workstations to allow you to work independently on your projects.

Entry Requirements

All courses are targeted at native speakers. You must either be a professional translator or have already received some training in translation. Please note that there is no entry test and you’ll be accepted on the merits of your CV.

Certificate of Completion

At the end of the course, you will receive a Certificate of Completion, provided that attendance has been satisfactory and you have completed your course projects.

For more information click HERE.

 

 

27.12.13

The Translation and Localization Conference 2014

Czy wiesz, że The Translation and Localization Conference 2014 to jedna z największych branżowych konferencji w Europie? Kilkuset uczestników z kilkunastu krajów, blisko 40 tematów, ważne i aktualne prelekcje, dyskusje z przedstawicielami czołowych stowarzyszeń, firm i organizacji. Jeśli działasz w branży tłumaczeniowej, musisz tu być!

Najbliższa, 3. edycja konferencji odbędzie się w Warszawie w dniach 28-29 marca 2014 r.

Tematami przewodnimi konferencji będą:
1)    Komunikacja techniczna: normalizacja, redakcja tekstów technicznych i ich znaczenie dla branży tłumaczeniowej
2)    Big Data a branża tłumaczeniowa: narzędzia CAT, tłumaczenie maszynowe, cloud computing, zarzadzanie projektami
3)    Ludzie i zespół: rekrutacja, rozwój zawodowy, procedury
Obecnie pracujemy nad programem poszczególnych bloków. Jeśli mają Państwo pomysł tematu „last minute”, prosimy o kontakt pod adresem info@translation-conference.com.

Więcej szczegółów tutaj.

12.12.13

Koziorożec (oryg. Capricorne) - tomy VI-VIII już w Polsce, tłumaczenie: Ola Bietti





KOZIOROŻEC 8 - TUNEL
 
Dane szczegółowe

Autor: Andreas

Wydawca: Sideca

Przekład: Olga Zasępa-Bietti 

Data Premiery: 22.11.2012 

Opis
Koncept kontroluje powierzchnię, ale jest miejsce, którego członkowie organizacji się obawiają - kanały. Tylko w ściekach uciekinierzy mogą poczuć się bezpiecznie. Choćby przez chwilę. Zbiegiem okoliczności Koziorożec i jego towarzysze wchodzą w posiadanie torby pełnej planów i notatek Konceptu. Wśród depesz, spisów i innych dokumentów znajdują mapę z zaznaczoną placówką systemu. Grupa postanawia działać i dotrzeć do tajnej bazy organizacji w nadziei poznania wroga. Droga wiedzie przez tunele Indian, łączące się z kanałami Nowego Jorku, z których jeden jest zapieczętowany. Grupa ignoruje pozostawione setki lat temu ostrzeżenia i otwiera go... Tymczasem na powierzchni Koncept poszukuje porwanego Samuela T. Growtha, którego teczką dysponuje Koziorożec. 

Sprawdź w Empiku, klikni tutaj.


 

11.11.13

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO TRANSLATION - CONFERENCE, 27-28 MARCH 2014

The leitmotif of the conference in 2014 is Audiovisual Translation. Papers are welcome both in AVT and other aspects of translation.
The aim of the conference is to present issues explored in translation studies, in particular in audiovisual translation (dubbing, subtitling, voice over, etc.) from a number of theoretical and empirical perspectives.  The conference themes will revolve around, but will not be limited to, the following issues:
             

             CAT tools
corpus linguistics in translation
multimodality in translation and AVT
cognitive linguistics in translation
 pragmatic aspects of  (translation of compliments, taboo words, greetings and leave-takings, phatics, im/politeness, discourse markers, humour, etc.)
 discursive approaches in AVT
 psycholinguistic approaches to AVT 
 eye-tracking in AVT
 culture- and language-specific issues in translation and AVT
 transferring literature onto the screen
 didactics of AVT
 subtitler training
  functional and communicative approaches to AVT
  translation norms in AVT
  qualitative and quantitative methods in AVT
  qualitative and quantitative methods in translation
   statistical methods in translation and AVT analysis
  accessibility to the media (audio description, subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, audio subtitling), etc.

The language of the conference is English.

FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE.

24.6.13

Audio Description for the Arts - A New FREE Course!

Link to the course description is HERE

Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
 Joel Snyder, current President of Audio Description Associates, will be giving on-line classes about Audio Description.

Courses are asynchronous - you can take it at your own time and may start and stop as many times as you want. This course should take 3-6 hours of your time.

To enroll click HERE
We are extremely excited to announce our latest addition to the FREE online courses - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. Using succinct, vivid, and imaginative describers, you can convey the visual image that is not fully accessible to a significant segment of the population and not fully realized by the rest of us — the rest of us being sighted folks who see, but who may not observe. Audio describers provide services in various multimedia settings, including theater, dance, opera, television, film/TV, exhibits, museums, and educational venues — but also at circuses, rodeos, ice skating exhibitions, and at a myriad of sports events.  This unique course will introduce participants to the principles of Audio Description, how to produce quality description, and the importance of close communication with the “end users” – people who are blind or have low vision and all people who support this innovative use of technology to provide greater media access. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. Using succinct, vivid, and imaginative describers, you can convey the visual image that is not fully accessible to a significant segment of the population and not fully realized by the rest of us — the rest of us being sighted folks who see, but who may not observe. Audio describers provide services in various multimedia settings, including theater, dance, opera, television, film/TV, exhibits, museums, and educational venues — but also at circuses, rodeos, ice skating exhibitions, and at a myriad of sports events.  This unique course will introduce participants to the principles of Audio Description, how to produce quality description, and the importance of close communication with the “end users” – people who are blind or have low vision and all people who support this innovative use of technology to provide greater media access. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf

19.6.13

The 13th Translation Conference: Translation and Crime (University of Portsmouth)

Saturday 9th November - Park Building, University of Portsmouth
The translation of crime fiction is all around us, from the current wave of Scandinavian and European crime novels, film and television to recent screen adaptations of classic crime fiction such as Sherlock Holmes.
It’s not only in fiction that translation meets crime. The police and the courts rely heavily on public service interpreters and translators. Translation itself is criminalised in various ways, e.g. in relation to copyright infringement, legal proceedings against translators of ‘problematic’ texts and various forms of piracy.
The 2013 Portsmouth Translation Conference aims to bring the different facets of translation and crime together in an interdisciplinary one-day conference, allowing exchange of ideas between translators, criminologists, interpreters, literary scholars and translation researchers.

Plenary Speakers

Now confirmed:
  • Dr Karen Seago (City University, London)
  • Dr Yvonne Fowler (Aston University)

Call for Papers

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers and 60-minute practical workshops on any area connecting crime and translation or interpreting. We welcome approaches from practitioners as well as researchers.
A selection of papers will be published in Jostrans, issue 22, July 2014
Topics may include (but are not limited to):
  • The challenges of translating crime fiction
  • Subtitling and dubbing thrillers
  • Crime, translation and the law
  • ‘True crime’ in translation
  • The role of translation and interpreting in criminal justice
  • Translation by and for criminals
  • Translation as a crime
  • Translation and forensic linguistics
  • The representation of translation and interpreting in crime fiction and film
Deadline extended: Enquiries and/or 300-word abstracts should be sent to translation@port.ac.uk by 30 June 2013.

More information at: http://www.port.ac.uk/research/translation/events/translationconference/

16.4.12

SUBTITLES FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PEOPLE - about the guidelines

Working on subtitles for deaf hard of hearing people (SDH or HoH) is, obviously, very different (and much more challenging) than making “normal” subtitles. And I don’t mean the technical differences only, we have to learn how people without the ability of hearing perceive the world.
In that case the subtitler must put himself in the position of a person who doesn’t hear anything. A good practice might be to watch a movie on mute, but with normal subtitles. At that moment we come to realize that it is impossible to understand everything, that one gets sometimes confused about what happened in the movie, that one is missing something. For instance: a dialogue between two people, a conversation that we understand since we turned on the”normal” subtitles. And suddenly they turn around, look at something or someone who wasn’t on screen just seconds before. What just happened? Did that third person say something? Did he make a noise? Yell?
Then, of course, there is music. We often don’t realize how big the role of music in movies is. Someone says, for example: “I don’t know what to do now”, without smiling or crying, just a neutral, maybe indifferent facial expression. A slow, sad song allows us to understand that the character is in a sad mood or that something sad is happening or about to happen. Similarly, a joyful, fast music makes us understand in a fraction of second that something good is about to happen. Without hearing that music, we as spectators, just don’t know how to react, what we were supposed to feel. Was the intention of the director to make us cry, smile, burst of laugh, or feel scared?
How to describe that music? “Slow music” doesn’t mean much – it can still be either sad or joyful. As a subtitler I must remember, though, that I have to describe it with as little characters as possible. And that’s often a big challenge because there is no time, something else is happening onscreen. Music can announce threat, consternation, terror and as a subtitler for hard of hearing people it is my role to describe it correctly, as close as possible to what is heard.
Then, there are subtitles themselves. Rule number 1 is that I am not allowed to spoil any kind of surprise, element that a “normal” viewer wouldn’t know about either. My subtitles can’t expose facts that are not known to the viewer yet.
I can’t forget to mention things that are happening onscreen but a deaf viewer might not understand – a woman hiding her face in her hands could be crying, laughing, sobbing, breathing hardly, taking deep breath, mumble something, she can be speaking normally, loudly or whispering. It is the subtitler’s role to make the distinction between those noises and describe them correctly.
There are also the technical rules: in particular the use of colours. The common practice is that subtitles are white for DVD’s and that they have colours in teletext (TV). In subtitles for TV the most important characters are given colours: green, yellow, red, clear blue, or purple. Studios might use different colours and also, in some cases, they always give a given colour to the most important character, let’s say that green always goes to the leading character, yellow to the second more important, etc.
When a character (especially one of the leading ones) appears the first time on screen, his or her name must precede the subtitle:
Margaret: Hello!
It is good practice to, where possible, add people’s names. Instead of saying: “Hello!”, the character could say: “Hello, John!”. In common subtitles we skip all noises like: ah, ugh, eh, etc. In SDH subtitles, at the contrary, we must write it - if we don’t do that, then the character opened his mouth, there is no subtitle and the viewer might think that something was said, maybe something important. The viewer gets confused.
The speed of reading for hard of hearing people is also lower than usual. And the guidelines for the speed should be provided by the studio.
It has been a challenge for me to make those subtitles, mostly in the beginning. But I got used to the rules, and I always hope that given that I did my best, the viewer will be satisfied. For me, making that kind of subtitles is also very rewarding, I feel that my job has more meaning and that fact makes my job even more important to me.

7.3.12

INTENSIVE SUMMER COURSE IN AUDIOVISUAL TRANSLATION

IMPERIAL COLLEGE (LONDON)

English into Polish
9th - 27th July 2012

In this age of rapid changes, audiovisual materials have become central to global communication and audiovisual translation (AVT) has become one of the most dynamically developing areas within Translation Studies. From a professional perspective, the volume of translation for the DVD, TV, cinema and internet markets has experienced a sharp increase in recent years.

The complexity of each of the different AVT modes – namely subtitling, voiceover, dubbing, subtitling for the deaf and hard-of-hearing and audio description for the blind and partially sighted – calls for the professional training of translators, who must be familiar with the latest developments in the field as well as versatile and flexible enough to respond to market requirements.

All these translation practices are in use in Poland and some, like voiceover, seem to follow long established standards. Others, however, have also found their way into the Polish market. These translation solutions are in high demand in an ever growing number of products to be distributed via conventional and less conventional devices. The internet and mobile devices are now fertile ground for the distribution of audiovisual materials that are very diverse in nature. Scientific and technical documentaries, educational contents, corporate materials, interviews, news reports, films, TV series, children's materials will necessarily require different approaches when translation is in order.

Course structure

This intensive three-week course provides a theoretical framework for translators and researchers in the area of AVT as well as valuable hands-on training with audiovisual material taken from different authentic contexts.

The first part of the course will focus on interlingual subtitling, and you will be introduced to a number of strategies, techniques and tools that professionals need in order to manage their work efficiently. You will work with professional subtitling software called WinCAPS. Other subtitling software will also be introduced.

Since voiceover is the main translation technique on Polish TV, the course will address selected aspects of this particular method. Translation for dubbing purposes will also be looked at in the sessions.

Finally, the course will address the problem of accessibility services, especially subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing (SDH) and audio description (AD) for the blind and the partially sighted.

Tuition will take place on Tuesday (full day), Thursday (afternoon) and Friday (afternoon) during 3 weeks (total 36 hours). These group sessions will cover strategies and techniques, standards, examples, software, managing contacts with clients, commissions, employment opportunities, and sample projects. The course will also include a study visit to the world’s leading film translation company located in London as well as a presentation of a professional set of film translation software offered by a major software manufacturer. As part of the course, students will follow various individual assignments in Imperial’s translation labs they will have access to. They will be required to spend a considerable amount of time in the computer lab in order to prepare translations of selected clips and there will be ample opportunities for practice and feedback during the classes.

In addition, students will be offered a 1 hour tutorial over the 3 weeks of the course during which you will be given an opportunity to work on the technical aspects of the different AVT types in more depth.

The course directors, Dr Agnieszka Szarkowska and Ms Renata Mliczak, are established trainers and researchers with close links to the industry and an encompassing knowledge of AVT.

For more information click here.

11.1.12

Art in Translation: International Conference on Language and the Arts

Call Deadline: 31-Jan-2012

Meeting Description:

Art in Translation: International Conference on Language and the Arts
University of Iceland and the Nordic House, Reykjavík, May 24-26, 2012

Art in Translation is a biannual conference to be held for the second time in 2012. Hosted by the Vigdís Finnbogadóttir Institute of Foreign Languages at the University of Iceland, this three-day event includes keynote speakers, a concert, an exhibition, and other program highlights alongside scholarly papers and artistic presentations. The aim of Art in Translation is to serve as an interdisciplinary forum for academics, artists, and members of the public to explore the connections between language and various art forms.

Participants are responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs, as well as a registration fee (60 euros/students 45 euros).

Call for Papers:

The 2012 conference seeks to address new trends in creative writing, particularly in its connections with other art forms and its role in unifying the arts. The conference features several keynote speakers and special guests and also invites proposals from scholars, professionals, and students from a wide range of disciplines (art, music, film, and literary history and theory, as well as linguistics, translation, anthropology, cultural studies, education, and other relevant fields). Equally welcome are proposals for papers or presentations from practitioners in any field in the arts.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

- New currents in creative writing
- Translating creative writing between languages and across cultures
- Alternative methods of text presentation; new textual forms
- Use of text in visual art
- Artists' writing and artist books
- Graphic novels
- Visual adaptations of text through theater or film
- Musical setting of poetry
- Ekphrastic poetry and other writing inspired by art
- Aesthetic challenges in translating one form of art to another
- The 'death of the author' in the digital age
- The role of writers' workshops in contemporary literature
- Experimental readings; performance of text

Submission Guidelines:

Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words. All proposals must clearly state the presenter's name, academic/professional affiliation, mailing address, phone number and email address. Presentations will be 20 minutes in length and will be in English.

Proposals should be sent to artintranslation@hi.is no later than January 31, 2012. Decisions will be announced by February 15, 2012.