24.6.13

Audio Description for the Arts - A New FREE Course!

Link to the course description is HERE

Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
 Joel Snyder, current President of Audio Description Associates, will be giving on-line classes about Audio Description.

Courses are asynchronous - you can take it at your own time and may start and stop as many times as you want. This course should take 3-6 hours of your time.

To enroll click HERE
We are extremely excited to announce our latest addition to the FREE online courses - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. Using succinct, vivid, and imaginative describers, you can convey the visual image that is not fully accessible to a significant segment of the population and not fully realized by the rest of us — the rest of us being sighted folks who see, but who may not observe. Audio describers provide services in various multimedia settings, including theater, dance, opera, television, film/TV, exhibits, museums, and educational venues — but also at circuses, rodeos, ice skating exhibitions, and at a myriad of sports events.  This unique course will introduce participants to the principles of Audio Description, how to produce quality description, and the importance of close communication with the “end users” – people who are blind or have low vision and all people who support this innovative use of technology to provide greater media access. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf
Description is a literary art form. It’s a type of poetry — a haiku. It provides a verbal version of the visual: the visual is made verbal, aural, and oral. Using succinct, vivid, and imaginative describers, you can convey the visual image that is not fully accessible to a significant segment of the population and not fully realized by the rest of us — the rest of us being sighted folks who see, but who may not observe. Audio describers provide services in various multimedia settings, including theater, dance, opera, television, film/TV, exhibits, museums, and educational venues — but also at circuses, rodeos, ice skating exhibitions, and at a myriad of sports events.  This unique course will introduce participants to the principles of Audio Description, how to produce quality description, and the importance of close communication with the “end users” – people who are blind or have low vision and all people who support this innovative use of technology to provide greater media access. - See more at: http://www.fracturedatlas.org/site/blog/2010/06/01/audio-description-for-the-arts-a-new-free-course/#sthash.WZEtXFus.8V9VHSZJ.dpuf

19.6.13

The 13th Translation Conference: Translation and Crime (University of Portsmouth)

Saturday 9th November - Park Building, University of Portsmouth
The translation of crime fiction is all around us, from the current wave of Scandinavian and European crime novels, film and television to recent screen adaptations of classic crime fiction such as Sherlock Holmes.
It’s not only in fiction that translation meets crime. The police and the courts rely heavily on public service interpreters and translators. Translation itself is criminalised in various ways, e.g. in relation to copyright infringement, legal proceedings against translators of ‘problematic’ texts and various forms of piracy.
The 2013 Portsmouth Translation Conference aims to bring the different facets of translation and crime together in an interdisciplinary one-day conference, allowing exchange of ideas between translators, criminologists, interpreters, literary scholars and translation researchers.

Plenary Speakers

Now confirmed:
  • Dr Karen Seago (City University, London)
  • Dr Yvonne Fowler (Aston University)

Call for Papers

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers and 60-minute practical workshops on any area connecting crime and translation or interpreting. We welcome approaches from practitioners as well as researchers.
A selection of papers will be published in Jostrans, issue 22, July 2014
Topics may include (but are not limited to):
  • The challenges of translating crime fiction
  • Subtitling and dubbing thrillers
  • Crime, translation and the law
  • ‘True crime’ in translation
  • The role of translation and interpreting in criminal justice
  • Translation by and for criminals
  • Translation as a crime
  • Translation and forensic linguistics
  • The representation of translation and interpreting in crime fiction and film
Deadline extended: Enquiries and/or 300-word abstracts should be sent to translation@port.ac.uk by 30 June 2013.

More information at: http://www.port.ac.uk/research/translation/events/translationconference/